Chacma Baboon Facts

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Slangkop Lighthouse

Did you know that Chacma Baboons....

* Live in troops of between eight and 150 baboons

* Females make up the core of the troop

* Males move between troops

* The most dominant adult male is known as the alpha male and he leads the troop



* Grow up to 120 centimetres tall

* Weigh up to 40 kilograms

* Live for up to 30 years

* Are omnivores, they eat mainly fruit,    
     but also eat flowers,
     leaves,
     roots,
     tubers,
     mushrooms,
     grasses,
     shoots,
     seeds,
     buds,
     small vertebrates and
     invertebrates

* Females reach adulthood at five years old, and males a year or two later.

* Gestation period is six months

* Generally a female will reproduce once every 2 years

* There are 11 troops on the Cape Peninsula

* Eric comes from the Slangkop troop in Kommetjie

* How you can help

* Baboons are wonderful, caring, gentle creatures but ALWAYS remember that baboons are WILD animals, you can't reason with a baboon. They can be dangerous.

* Don't feed the baboons and don't eat in front of them, don't hide your food from them. If they try to take food away from you just let them have it.

* Don't tease them

* Never get between a mother and her baby

* Kommetjie Primary School has a great website about the baboons, for more tips on encounters with baboons click here.

News of Eric can be seen here

To See Baboons:

Take a trip down to Cape Point, the chances are you will see them there. Please do not feed the baboons!

Conservation status To help click

The remaining Chacma Baboons on the peninsula face a bleak future due to loss of habitat and conflict between man and baboon as the peninsula gets more and more built up. At the current mortality rate there will not be a viable baboon population on the peninsula within the next 10 years, and it is predicted that within 15 years baboons will face certain extinction.

Walking with baboons with Baboon Matters experienced guides is an incredible experience.